Water Quality in the Comox Valley

Drinking water In the Comox Valley Regional District (CVRD) is regularly tested to ensure it meets Canadian drinking water guidelines. To ensure its ongoing quality, the CVRD continues to upgrade the region’s treatment and distribution systems.

What Do We Do To Our Drinking Water?

We add small amounts of chlorine gas to our water to ensure it is suitable to drink. The Ministry of Health requires a level of chlorine in all drinking water between 0.25 and 0.3 parts per million. Each year, the CVRD performs a drinking water analysis to ensure adherence to all Canadian drinking water guidelines. The ideal is to achieve 0.5 mg per litre of free chlorine residual in water samples taken at the ends of each system.

Information About Recent Media Coverage on Lead Levels in Drinking Water

Drinking water in our reservoirs and within the distribution system are regularly tested to ensure it meets Canadian drinking water guidelines. Lead levels are always well within Health Canada’s guidelines.

The CVRD is regulated by Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA) as part of the Ministry of Health for its activities as a potable water supplier. Under the Drinking Water Protection Act (DWP Act), the CVRD is required to report annually on the CVWS. This report covers the period from January 1 to December 31 and includes information on water quality, consumption, maintenance and capital projects.

The CVRD strives to provide high quality drinking water through responsible operation, monitoring, and management of the water system. To ensure its ongoing quality, the CVRD continues to upgrade the region’s treatment and transmission systems. Construction has begun on a new water treatment system to serve communities in the CVRD which will include new intake infrastructure, pumping stations and pipelines, force mains, transmission mains and a filtration

Lead Plumbing in Homes and Schools

Regional and municipal jurisdiction over water quality ends at the property service connection. Residents may have private lead lines on their property, or lead containing plumbing and fixtures in their homes. Older homes, typically those built more than 40 years ago, are more likely to have lead containing pipes and plumbing/fixtures. Residents can take steps to check for lead infrastructure in their homes, and to reduce their exposure by running the tap water for a few minutes before use, installing filters certified for lead, or replacing lead containing plumbing infrastructure.

Institutions such as hospitals and schools are tested by Island Health and SD71 and we work closely together with both organizations to ensure optimal water quality for residents of the Comox Valley.  The school district has issued a press release reassuring the public that drinking water in Comox Valley schools is safe.