FAQs - archive

Questions in the news:
Who would pay for the service, and what would it cost? What would happen when the 3-year contract is up?  
Was the Request for Proposals advertised? 

What factors are considered when selecting the successful proponent of the RFP?

Why is the cost for garbage and collection service in Royston lower than what is being offered to the electoral areas of A, B and C? 

 Can residents opt out of the service?

Was there any public consultation about this program? Are the results from the 2013 CVRD resident survey statistically valid? 
Other frequently asked questions:
What is the cost for the roadside solid waste collection project?
What would the proposed service include? Who would receive the service?
Is this the CVRD’s way of moving away from recycling depots/facilities? Why is the CVRD considering this service?
When would the service start? What types of materials would be collected as part of the recycling program? 
Why is garbage limited to one 80 litre can? Will the new provincial product stewardship plan affect the proprosed plan?
When is the referendum? Who can vote?

 

1.       What would the proposed service include?
The service would include weekly pick up of garbage (up to one 80L can) and recycling (unlimited quantities). In the future, collection may expand to include yard waste and organics.

2.      Who would receive the service?
If approved, all residential properties within the service area would receive the service except for apartment buildings with more than 4 units and mobile home parks. The service area includes the electoral areas A, B and C, excluding Denman Island, Hornby Island, the Royston garbage collection area and the Mt. Washington resort community.

 3.      Who would pay for the service, and what would it cost?
The costs of the service, if approved, would be shared amongst the owners of the properties receiving it. Homeowners would receive a utility bill issued by the CVRD. The initial service contract with BFI Canada would be for a period of three (3) years at a cost of approximately $150 per household, per year.

4.      What would happen when the 3-year contract is up?
The initial contract is based on a cost to homeowners of approximately $150 per year for the service, after the three-year term the CVRD could negotiate on a two-year extension to the contract. However, if the terms of an extension cannot be agreed to, the CVRD would proceed with another Request for Proposal (RFP) similar to the process that was undertaken this past August for the proposed program.

5.     Was the Request for Proposals advertised? 
The Request for Proposals was an open, competitive bid process meaning that all interested collection contractors had the opportunity to respond. It was advertised on the CVRD website and BC Bid beginning August 1, 2013. The closing date was September 10, 2013.

6. What factors are considered when selecting the successful proponent of the RFP? 
The submissions for the roadside collection were evaluated against the point-rated criteria that was outlined in the RFP.  
i. Financial (Overall cost/price) 50
ii. Experience/Reputation/Resources 20
iii. Technical 20
iv. Environmental/Sustainability 10
Total Available Points 100

The original RFP [PDF - 1.4 MB], Roadside RFP Evaluation [PDF - 77 KB] ,(including Addendum #1 [PDF - 70 KB]) provides additional information on the criteria used in the selection and the scope of work requirements. 

7.     Why is the cost for garbage and collection service in Royston lower than what is being offered to the electoral areas of A, B and C? 
Every contract is negotiated with potential supplier(s). The Royston collection service was acquired from the Royston Improvement District in 2010 and the RFP was issued in June 2012 when the contract expired.  The evaluation of the Royston RFP was based on the scope of work and criteria outlined in the RFP.  The proponents’ submissions for the Royston service area would have taken into consideration a number of factors including - but not limited to – the number of residents, geographical size of the Royston area, density of the area, and the volume of materials collected.  

8.      Can residents opt out of the service?
No – if the service is approved, all eligible residential properties in the service area would receive weekly pick-up of garbage and recycling.

9.  What was the cost for the roadside solid waste collection project?

The expenses for the roadside solid waste collection project and referendum to date (Dec.19, 2013) are:

- Meeting room expenses (bookings for voting places) - $840
- Professional fees (includes costs for studies, survey, consultant and project
management fees, and election officials stipends) - $30,949
- Advertising - $4343
- Legal fees - $2205
- Office supplies (for the referendum) - $1322
Total expenses to date: $39,659

In November 2012, the CVRD board approved up to $60,000 in feasibility study funds for this project.

10      Is this the CVRD’s way of moving away from recycling depots/facilities?
Late last year, the directors for electoral areas A, B and C asked us to explore this initiative, as it appeared that public interest might be growing for roadside collection of garbage and recycling. The results of the CVRD 2013 resident survey showed that, of the 150 rural area residents who participated in the telephone survey, the majority (75 per cent) indicated they would support such a program. The proposed service and referendum are being pursued independently of any decisions by Comox Strathcona Waste Management, which has the responsibility for regional recycling depots and their facilities. The future of the depots has not yet been determined.

11.      Why is the CVRD considering this service?
There are two main reasons that this service is being considered at this time:

  1. Environment – the 2012 Comox Strathcona solid waste management plan sets a goal to divert 70 per cent of the region’s solid waste away from landfills. The plan is a long term vision for solid waste management, shaped by extensive consultation with the public over a period of two years.  The proposed service would make it much easier and more convenient for residents of the service area to recycle, which will benefit the environment, help the region achieve its waste diversion goals, and discourage illegal dumping or the burning of waste.
     
  2. Public support – in response to indications of growing public support for a garbage and recycling pick-up program, the directors for areas A, B and C requested that the CVRD explore the feasibility of establishing such a service. As an initial way to gauge if residents might support the idea, a short series of questions was included in the CVRD’s 2013 resident survey. Of the 150 rural area residents who participated in the telephone survey, the majority (75 per cent) indicated they would support a program. The next step was to gather more information about service details and costing through a request for proposals process. That process is complete, and it is now up to residents to vote on the proposed service at a referendum scheduled for Saturday, November 16th, 2013.

12.      Was there any public consultation about this program?
 The proposed program is the result of working through the updated 2012 solid waste management plan (SWMP) – a long-term guiding document that identifies how the CVRD will manage the region’s waste now and into the future.  As part of this process, extensive public consultation was undertaken throughout the spring of 2012 including:

  • 14 open houses/presentations in locations throughout the region
  • feedback forms completed at the open houses and on-line (700 received)
  • a telephone survey of 600 randomly selected homes covering all communities in the CSWM area to achieve an accuracy of ±4.0%, with a 95% confidence interval
  • presentations to all electoral area sub-committees of the Comox Valley and Strathcona Regional Districts. 

Further, of the 150 rural area residents surveyed as part of the 2013 CVRD resident survey, the majority (75 per cent) indicated they would support a program of garbage and recycling roadside collection. These results are consistent with both the public input gathered as part of the SWMP, as well as general feedback from area directors indicating that resident support for a roadside collection program appeared to be growing.

13     Are the results from the 2013 CVRD resident survey statistically valid? 
Quantitative surveying is based on the mathematical laws of probability that determine the accuracy of a result, within a particular margin of error, regardless of the size of the entire population. In the case of the residents surveyed for the roadside collection proposal, the results would have been the same, plus or minus 8 points, at least 95 times out of 100.

14.      When would the service start?
If approved, the service would start in September, 2014.

15.      What types of materials would be collected as part of the recycling program? 
The proposed recycling program is “single-stream”, meaning there would be no need for residents to sort materials. Items would need to be placed in marked containers or bags.
What goes in? Single stream recycling visual.pdf [PDF - 1.6 MB]
Acceptable items would include:

  • Beverage containers / milk jugs
  • Plastics # 1 thru #7
  • Metal food containers (rinsed with labels removed)
  • Newsprint and boxboard
  • Cardboard (flattened AND tied)
  • Paper/mixed waste paper (junk mail, telephone books, magazines, envelopes and stationary)

Unacceptable items would include glass, styrofoam, household hazardous wastes (ex. paint, motor oil, antifreeze, batteries, electronics), plastic film and most wrapping paper.

16.      Why is garbage limited to one 80 litre can?
The main reason for the size limit is to prevent injuries to collection workers when they lift the cans. When offered in combination with a recycling program, many communities have shifted towards limiting garbage to one can per week. If the service is approved, the CVRD would explore options for allowing additional cans to be put out when required.

17.    Will the new provincial product stewardship plan affect the proprosed plan?
Households are already familiar with product stewardship programs (such as the Return-It depots) that collect materials such as deposit beverage containers, paint, batteries and electronics. These programs make producers and consumers responsible for recycling products that are no longer useful.In April 2013 the BC Ministry of Environment approved a new product stewardship plan for packaging and printed paper (PPP) from residential sources. Examples include non-deposit food and beverage containers, cereal boxes, plastic wrap, Styrofoam packaging, cosmetic and hygiene product containers, plastic containers, cardboard, newspapers, magazines and flyers.  

A newly formed not-for-profit agency, Multi-Material British Columbia (MMBC), will manage the collection and processing of PPP materials. MMBC is currently working with local governments and producers on the groundwork for the plan’s implementation. The start date of the MMBC plan isn’t confirmed yet, but the CVRD is committed to keeping residents updated as information becomes available.

Local governments providing residential curbside recycling programs as of November 2012 were offered a collection incentive to continue providing PPP curbside collection under the new plan. This proposed program is not eligible for incentives in the initial rollout, but could apply after the new product stewardship plan is implemented. 

18.     When is the referendum?
The referendum is scheduled for Saturday, November 16th, 2013. Advance voting is available on October 29th, November 6th, 2013 and November 13th, 2013. Location of voting polls and times

19.     Who can vote?
You may be able to vote if you live in or own property within the proposed service area, being electoral areas of A, B, and C, excluding Denman Island, Hornby Island, the Royston garbage collection area and the Mt. Washington resort community. We encourage you to have your say – mark your calendars and vote!

20.    Where can I get more information?
An open house is scheduled for Tuesday, October 22nd, 2013 from 5:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. in the CVRD boardroom located at 550B Comox Road, Courtenay B.C. Also watch for CVRD representatives in the community during Waste Reduction Week (October 21st – 25th) and during the first two weeks of November, leading up to the referendum.