Q & A's

Home Background Q & A's Elector Response Media

Frequently Asked Questions 

Q. Why is the split supported?
Q. What is an AAP?
Q. Who can take part in the alternative approval process?
Q. How is the electoral approval determined?
Q. What about a tax levy for this service?
Q. How would the proposed bylaw benefit the citizens on Denman?
Q. What is the benefit of splitting the service?
Q. How does the Parks Service currently function?
Q, Will this result in an increased tax rate?

Why is the split supported?

  • Each island is better able to look after its own unique interests
  • Community parks requisition are focused to activities specific to the island i.e., taxes collected on Denman would stay on Denman
  • There would be no increase to the maximum requisition

Process

  • CVRD board will need to approve the legislative requirements to conduct an AAP
  • submission of both bylaws for inspector approval after Aug 25, 2015 meeting 
  • advertising for the AAP is to be done in early November once each week for two consecutive weeks in a newspaper distributed in the area defined for the AAP and published in keeping with provisions for posting public notices set out in the local government’s procedure bylaw
  • eligible electors have at least 30 days from the publication of the second notice to submit elector response forms before the AAP deadline.  Forms received after this deadline cannot be counted 
  • the deadline for return of alternative approval forms has been set for Friday, December 11, 2015 
  • results of AAP are to be presented at the December 15, 2015 CVRD board meeting 
  • adoption of bylaw 385 and 386 can occur as of the December 15, 2015 CVRD board meeting

Back to top

Q.What is an AAP?
A.
There are several different ways for local governments to gather feedback from the public. One effective tool is the alternate approval process.  This process helps regional districts and municipalities measure public approval for matters such as bylaws, new borrowing arrangements and changes to existing services.  It works by giving residents the opportunity to vote against or oppose these matters. Today, the alternative approval process is a common way for councils and boards to find out the wishes of the public. It is a valid process to gain elector approval but is less costly than a referendum and allows the public time to review details and ask questions. 

Back to top 

Q.Who can take part in the alternative approval process?
A.
Individuals who live in or own property in the physical area to which the proposed service applies may be able to take part in the process.  In this instance, the total number of electors within the Denman Island community parks and greenways service area is determined to be 798.  Individuals may only submit one elector response form each. 

Back to top 

Q.How is the electoral approval determined?
A.
The CVRD may proceed with adoption of Bylaw No. 386 being “Denman Island Community Parks and Greenways Service Establishment Bylaw No. 386, 2015” if fewer than 80 electors, 10 per cent of the total number of electors within the Denman Island community parks and greenways service area (which is 798), sign and submit elector response forms opposing the CVRD board’s adoption of the bylaw.  Otherwise, if 80 or more valid elector response forms are received the CVRD board must obtain the assent of the electors by way of referendum. 

Back to top 

Q.What about a tax levy for this service?
A.
No increase in the tax requisition is projected at this time and taxes collected on Denman will stay on Denman.  

Back to top 

Q.How would the proposed bylaw benefit the citizens on Denman?
A.
The needs of Hornby and Denman Islands with relation to community parks and greenways are very different.  A split in the existing service would provide an opportunity for each island to care for their own unique needs.  Island specific services will focus the community parks requisition to activities specific to that island, i.e., funds that are requisitioned from Hornby Island will be used for activities only on Hornby and similarly for the Denman Island service.  

Back to top

Q. What is the benefit of splitting the service?
A. This would help to ensure that Hornby Island residents pay for their parks service priorities and Denman
Island residents fund their island’s parks service priorities. 

Back to top
 
Q. How does the Parks Service currently function?
A. Currently, the Denman and Hornby Island community parks and greenways service is shared between the two islands for park related activities on both islands. 

Back to top
 
Q. Will this result in an increased tax rate?
A. There will be no change in the tax rate for the parks service as a result of this process. 

Back to top